“Currents” – The Port of Redwood City Newsletter – January 26, 2017

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 Like us on Facebook   Follow us on Twitter  www.redwoodcityport.com                                                  January 26,  2017

Port Reports Slight Increase in Cargo Movement for 1st Half of Fiscal Year 2016-2017

The Port of Redwood City experienced a 0.2 percent increase in cargo movement across its docks for the 1st half of fiscal year 2016/2017 that ended December 31, 2016 with 860,349 metric tons (MT).

Imported sand and aggregates accounted for 589,735 metric tons (MT). These products are used in Silicon Valley and Redwood City construction projects.

The next largest tonnage was exported shredded scrap metal, totaling 154,401 MT. Gypsum imports reached 72,111 MT.  Although not large quantities, imported bauxite, domestic sand and ground slag added to the mix of inbound cargo.

Forty-nine vessels (36 ships and 13 barges) made calls during the first half of FY 17.

The construction aggregates arrive at the Port in large ocean going ships that are equipped with on board conveyors for unloading.  The ships, owned by CSL (Canadian Steamship Lines), load this material at the Orca Quarry, located on the northeast coast of Vancouver Island, Canada.  The high-quality sand and gravel aggregates are used to make concrete that meets the highest seismic engineering standards.

Sims Metal Management exports the scrap metal which it recycles at the Port to the Far
East.

Update on Proposed Wharf Improvements

The Port Commission has approved significant measures to mitigate environmental impacts for improvements to Wharves 3 & 4. The findings in the report by the Port mean that mitigation measures will be added to the project to avoid or reduce all environmental impacts to less than a significant level.

 That action, plus approving a mitigation monitoring and reporting program during construction, are the necessary steps before the project goes to bid to select a contractor.

  The proposed project replaces what are called fender systems at Wharves 3 and 4, which have been degraded since their original construction in the 1980s.  A fender is like a bumper used to absorb the kinetic energy of a vessel berthing against the wharf. Fender systems typically consist of timber fender piles at the face of the wharf with energy absorbing fenders between the timber fender piles and the wharf.

However, to extend the useful life of the new fender system beyond 30 years, steel pilings will replace the wood pilings and steel panels with large rubber cushions will protect the wharf from any damage from ships.

 Mitigation measures during construction are important to minimize impacts to the aquatic environment of SF Bay and the nearby Bair Island salt marsh.

  • To the extent possible all piles (30-inch and 66-inch in diameter) will be installed using a vibratory hammer to minimize noise.
  • Noise and vibration in the water during installation of piles will be measured.  If acceptable levels are exceeded “bubble curtains” will be installed to reduce impacts on fish and marine mammals.
  • Work activities shall be halted when a marine mammal enters the 1,600-foot safety zone and will resume only when the animal has been gone from the area for a minimum of 15 minutes.
  • If construction activities occur during bird nesting season, (Feb. 1 through Aug. 31) a biologist will survey the area in the vicinity of construction and results will be sent to California Dept. of Fish and Wildlife and mitigation measures will be adopted to avoid direct losses of active nests, eggs, and nestlings.

Tall Ships Visit Port March 16-29

The historic tall ships Lady Washington and Hawaiian Chieftain will visit the Port of Redwood March 16-29 and offer education programs to elementary school children during the days as well as public dockside vessel tours, adventure and battle sails. Enjoy a living history experience, sea shanties, maritime storytelling and the boom of cannons, (minus the cannon balls of course).

  • March 16 (Thursday) ARRIVAL
  • March 17 (Friday)
    Vessel Tours: 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. ($5 donation)
  • March 18 (Saturday)
    Vessel Tours: 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. ($5 donation)
    Battle Sail: 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. $42-$79
  • March 19 (Sunday)
    Vessel Tours: 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. ($5 donation)
    Adventure Sail: 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
    Battle Sail: 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. $42-$79
  • March 20 (Monday)
    Boats closed to the public
  • March 21 (Tuesday)
    Vessel Tours: 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. ($5 donation)
  • March 22 (Wednesday)
    Vessel Tours: 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. ($5 donation)
  • March 23 (Thursday)
    Vessel Tours: 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. ($5 donation)
  • March 24 (Friday)
    Vessel Tours: 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. ($5 donation)
  • March 25 (Saturday)
    Battle Sail: 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. $42-$79 (Note: Change in Battle Sail Time)
    Vessel Tours: 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. ($5 donation)
  • March 26 (Sunday)
    Adventure Sail: 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. $42-$49
    Battle Sail: 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. $42-$79 (Note: Change in Battle Sail Time)
    Vessel Tours: 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. ($5 donation)
  • March 27 (Monday)
    Boats closed to the public
  • March 28 (Tuesday)
    Vessel Tours: 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. ($5 donation)
  • March 29 (Wednesday) DEPARTURE

For more information about the ships, visit: http://www.historicalseaport.org

The historic tall ships Lady Washington and Hawaiian Chieftain

Tidbits from Port’s History

This is the Port’s 80th anniversary year and the City of Redwood City’s 150th anniversary year.

Please join us on Facebook and Twitter to see about two Port history tidbits a week throughout the year.

Port 80th Anniversary Tidbit No. 1: This year the City of Redwood City is celebrating its 150th anniversary. The Port of Redwood City is celebrating its 80th anniversary. But the Port is older! Discover why as we unveil 80 historical “tidbits” over the year.

Port 80th Anniversary Tidbit No. 2: A precursor to Port: One day in 1851 it was discovered that a creek running through the Peninsula emptied directly into a naturally deep channel of water that, in turn, flowed into San Francisco Bay. Logging companies quickly made use of this valuable natural resource as a water highway, easily and economicallyCarrying lumber by oxen to Redwood Creek for barging to San Francisco in 1850s.moving huge redwood logs down from the hills and into the channel. Once positioned in the channel, the logs were stacked on barges or lashed together for the final journey to San Francisco, where they were ultimately milled into lumber.

Port 80th Anniversary Tidbit No. 3: In 1851, the “discovery” of Redwood Creek spurred a shipbuilding industry. The first schooner was built in 1851 by G.M. Burnham and appropriately named “Redwood.” Shipbuilding remained an active industry until the last wooden ship built in Redwood City, called the “Perseverance,” was launched in 1883. The Port of Redwood City is considered the place of genesis for the shipbuilding industry on the Pacific West Coast. https://en.wikipedia.org/w…/Redwood_Creek_(San_Mateo_County)

Port 80th Anniversary Tidbit No. 4: Among the first entrepreneurs to use that waterway highway to move their timber to market was owned by Dr. Robert O. Tripp, founder of the

Robert O. Tripp

historic Woodside Store, and his partner, Mathias A. Parkhurst. Because redwood trees were so abundant it’s not at all surprising that the creek was named “Redwood Creek,” the town that sprang up near it was called “Redwood City”, and the waterfront came to be known first as El Embarcadero and then as the “Port of Redwood City.” http://www.historysmc.org/main.php?page=wshistory

Port of Redwood City  |  675 Seaport Blvd  |  Redwood City, CA 94063