Bridging the Gap to Greater Beneficial Reuse Part II

November 18, 2016

If you read our blog post from a couple of weeks ago, you learned about some of BPC’s history in the dredging community and how we continue to be the voice of industry in San Francisco Bay. This includes providing the most up to date information on issues such as the movement of goods, water quality and supply, energy, and transportation infrastructure by way of electronic mailings, social media, committees, and Workshops and Expert Briefings. We brought together top leaders in the dredging community on November 9th to provide insight and updates on dredging and beneficial reuse in San Francisco Bay.

site-updates

Panel: Updates on Beneficial Reuse Opportunities

It was a packed room at the Port of Oakland as BPC held it’s 3rd annual Dredging and Beneficial Workshop. With a focus on practical solutions, the theme of this year’s Workshop was Bridging the Gap to Greater Beneficial Reuse. Our program included updates on current and potential beneficial reuse sites around San Francisco Bay, demonstrations on useful data and web tools for dredge operations, a presentation on the industry perspective on offloaders, and more. We also heard from the San Francisco Bay Conservation and Development Commission’s Executive Director on how BCDC’s lawsuit against the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers may impact dredging operations now and in the future.

funding-opps

Panel: Funding Opportunities

BPC thanks the Dredging and Beneficial Reuse Committee for helping put together a great program, and to Haley & Aldrich for their generous Workshop sponsorship. We look forward to another successful Workshop in 2017.

Click here to view the program and presentations.

“The Bay Planning Coalition is a non-profit organization well known for its advocacy and credibility in the San Francisco Bay Area corporate and environmental community. When we speak about an issue, legislators and regulators listen.” – John A. Coleman, CEO

Comments

  1. Phyllis Faber says:

    Salt marshes in San Francisco Bay are suffering from the lack of sediment that no longer is provided by river sediment or by historic gold mining operations. Marsh drainage channels are slumping and being hollowed out and surface elevations are eroding as sediment is not replaced by daily tidal action. We have data showing this effect. It is imperative that some portion of the sediment that is dredged from places like the Oakland harbor and Corte Madera Creek be allowed to stay in the Bay to maintain the health and elevation of the tidal salt marshes.

  2. Phyllis Faber says:

    Your comment is awaiting moderation.

    Salt marshes in San Francisco Bay are suffering from the lack of sediment that no longer is provided by river sediment or by historic gold mining operations. Marsh drainage channels are slumping and being hollowed out and surface elevations are eroding as sediment is not replaced by daily tidal action. We have data showing this effect. It is imperative that some portion of the sediment that is dredged from places like the Oakland harbor and Corte Madera Creek be allowed to stay in the Bay to maintain the health and elevation of the tidal salt marshes.
    Reply