Alameda CTC Transportation E-News for May 2016

  PLAN  ·  FUND  ·  DELIVER

MAY 2016

May Is Bike Month!

Activities are happening throughout Alameda County and the Bay Area in celebration of Bike Month in May. Create or join a Team Bike Challenge at your workplace for friendly competition, logging your miles in the saddle, and bike to work on the Bay Area’s 22nd annual Bike to Work Day, Thursday, May 12. You can enjoy new bike lanes, visit energizer stations located throughout the county that day or join fellow bicyclists for an after-work bike happy hour.

May 12 is also Bike to School Day at many Alameda County schools. Watch for the BikeMobile coming to a school near you; or if you want to tune up your bicycling skills, learn theft prevention tactics or get tips for riding at night, Alameda CTC sponsors free Bicycle Safety Classes in English, Cantonese and Spanish to help all riders feel comfortable cycling throughout the county. For more information visit the Bike East Bay website.

Alameda CTC is sponsoring a number of bicycle and pedestrian projects over the next several years, see Alameda CTC’s new Capital Projects Delivery Plan for details. Also in this issue, learn about the Sustainable Communities Technical Assistance Program, which funds bicycle and pedestrian improvements and other transportation improvements throughout the county.

Transportation News

Contractor Opportunities

Get FasTrak to Use the I-580 Express Lanes in the Tri-Valley

Commute with Confidence – Sign up for the Guaranteed Ride Home Program

Corvallis Elementary
Wins Award

On March 24, 2016
Alameda CTC presented Corvallis Elementary School
in San Leandro, part of the
San Lorenzo Unified School District, with the 2016 Platinum Sneaker Award. Corvallis students achieved the highest percentage increase in Alameda County schools for its students’ walking, cycling, skating or using shared rides to get to school during this year’s Alameda County Pollution Solution Golden Sneaker Contest.

Transportation Hub

Alameda County is the gateway to the world for goods movement, integral to the region’s economic growth. Our transit operators move millions of residents and workers to, through and beyond the county.

  • 90% of Bay Area trade by weight goes through the Port of Oakland.
  • 33% of jobs in Alameda County are goods-movement dependent.
  • ~100 million riders boarded transit in Alameda County
    in 2014.

What’s Ahead

May is Bike Month. There areevents throughout the county
to celebrate.

May 12: Bike to Work Day and Bike to School Day (at variouslocations)

May 18: Ped-Bike Webinar on Aspects of Equity

May 23: Paratransit Advisory and Planning Committee Meeting

May 26: Commission Meeting

All events are at Alameda CTC unless otherwise noted.

Learn More 

About Alameda CTC

The Alameda County Transportation Commission plans, funds and delivers transportation programs and projects that expand access and improve mobility to foster a vibrant and livable Alameda County. Funding sources for Alameda CTC’s expenditure plans include Measure B, approved by 81.5 percent of county voters in 2000, and Measure BB, approved by more than 70 percent of
voters in 2014.

For more information, visit:

Top

In This Issue

  

Capital Projects Delivery Plan: Transportation improvements throughout Alameda County

Alameda CTC has identified a set of 20 regionally significant Measure BB-funded projects for which it will take the primary project sponsor role to ensure delivery as promised to Alameda County voters.
(Read more)

Sustainable Communities Technical Assistance Program: On-call expertise in priority development areas

Alameda CTC’s Sustainable Communities Technical Assistance Program (SC-TAP) provides local jurisdictions with on-call consultant expertise primarily for projects located in priority development areas or growth opportunity areas.
(Read more)

 

On the Move Around Alameda County

Restoring Albany and Berkeley Shorelines: Park District plans to extend San Francisco Bay Trail (Read more)

Road and Pedestrian Facility Upgrades in Hayward: Measure B, Measure BB and VRF funds play an integral role (Read more)

Wheels Bus Network Changes: Ridership and efficiency improvements in the Tri-Valley (Read more)

Ferry Service Improvements: Measure B and BB improve ferries, terminals and parking (Read more)

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A1

Capital Projects Delivery Plan

Transportation improvements throughout Alameda County

 

Alameda CTC has identified a set of 20 regionally significant Measure BB-funded projects for which it will take the primary project sponsor role to ensure delivery as promised to Alameda County voters. TheMeasure BB Capital Project Delivery Plan approved by the Commission in March 2016 provides information regarding the scope of these selected projects that span multiple jurisdictions andan initial work program framework for how the agency will manage them.

The Capital Project Delivery Plan allows the Commission to initiate and accelerate the delivery of capital projects by partnering with local jurisdictions to bring early benefits to Alameda County residents and to be a driving force for transportation improvements and economic development.

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A2

Sustainable Communities Technical Assistance Program

On-Call expertise in priority development areas

 

Alameda CTC’s Sustainable Communities Technical Assistance Program (SC-TAP) provides local jurisdictions with on-call consultant expertise primarily for projects located in priority development areas or growth opportunity areas. Since 2014, SC-TAP has enabled implementation of local complete streets policies, transit supportive land use projects, as well as bicycle and pedestrian improvement projects.

Iron Horse Trail

Three projects of note include Clement Avenue Complete Street Corridor Concept Study, which the City of Alameda approved in February 2016; the Iron Horse Trail Connectivity
Feasibility Study
, for which the City of Dublin held a third and final public workshop in April 2016; and the Tri-Valley Integrated Transit and Park-and-Ride Study, for which Alameda CTC, Livermore Amador Valley Transit Authority and the cities of Livermore, Dublin and Pleasanton have completed an inventory of existing park-and-ride facilities in the Tri-Valley.

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A4

On the Move Around Alameda County

Restoring Albany and Berkeley Shorelines: Park District plans to extend to San Francisco Bay Trail

 

The East Bay Regional Park District is excited to move forward with plans to extend the San Francisco Bay Trail and restore the shorelines along the Albany and Berkeley waterfronts. Using funds from Measures CC and WW, the Park District has already embarked on the first phase of the project, a five-year plan to improve habitat, public access and trail conditions at Albany Beach, at the foot of Buchanan Street. The $3.9 million undertaking, which was approved in the McLaughlin Eastshore State Park General Plan, is the first phase of a long-term plan to improve the shoreline between Buchanan Street in Albany and Gilman Street in Berkeley.

The second and third phases include an extension of the Bay Trail west of Golden Gate Fields, dune and wetland restoration at Albany Beach, restrooms, parking and other improvements. Those projects will be funded by Measures CC and WW, the Coastal Conservancy, Measure B via the Alameda County Transportation Commission, Cosco Busan Trustee Council and other sources. The Park District expects to award the design and engineering contract for the second and third phases early this year.

For more information, contact Public Information Supervisor Carolyn Jones at (510) 544-2217 or cjones@ebparks.org.

A5Road and Pedestrian Facility Upgrades in Hayward: 

Measure B, Measure BB and VRF funds play an integral role

 

The City of Hayward relies heavily on Measure B, Measure BB and Vehicle Registration Fee funding to continue its efforts to improve both roadways and bicycle and pedestrian facilities. In fiscal year 2015, the city reconstructed pavement along Hawthorne Avenue, Capri Avenue, Arf Avenue, Cryer Street, Virginia Street, Edwin Way, Valle Vista Avenue, Westwood Street, Inglewood Street, Isabella Street, Adobe Court, Highland Boulevard, Elkgrove Court and Spring Court; and improved paving conditions on Ocie Way, Ida Lane, Quincy Way, Dunn Road and Jerilynn Lane. The city also constructed new sidewalk along portions of Laurel Avenue.

Over the next two fiscal years, pavement rehabilitation and reconstruction will bring 33 streets up to excellent pavement standards, among them are Hayward Boulevard, Addison Way, Berry Avenue, Capri Avenue, La Mesa Drive, Silverthorne Place, Taylor Avenue and Watkins Street. The city will also install more speed-monitoring devices along key roadways throughout Hayward.

In addition, Measure B and Measure BB will fund construction of new sidewalks along portions of Hayward Boulevard and Donald Avenue, and work will continue toward maintaining and upgrading the city’s network of pedestrian traffic signals. For more information, contact Hayward Public Works at (510) 583-4730.

A6Wheels Bus Network Changes: Ridership and efficiency improvement in the Tri-Valley

The Livermore Valley Transit Authority (LAVTA) and the Wheels Forward planning team have developed a series of proposed changes to the Wheels bus network that are expected toimprove ridership and efficiency. The changes will result in a more easy-to-use transit system that reduces duplication of services, meandering routes and inconvenient loops, and provides more frequent service to key destinations, such as Las Positas College and the BART and ACE stations in the Tri-Valley.

Due to the proposed changes being implemented without increases in funding, trade-offs were made that reduced service in areas that cannot support fixed-route service. Major recommendations include a realignment of the Rapid bus to serve Las Positas College, increasing Route 10 service to every 15-minutes, providing more direct service through Hacienda and eliminating four unproductive routes. Additionally, LAVTA staff are working on a demonstration project in the City of Dublin that would use real-time dynamic ridesharing as an alternative to operating a large bus.

LAVTA accepted comments on the full proposal until April 22, and the LAVTA Board held a public hearing on May 2 in Livermore. For more information, visit www.wheelsforward.com.

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A7Ferry Service Improvements: 

Measure B and BB improve ferries, terminals and parking

The Water Emergency Transportation Authority (WETA) uses Measure B and Measure BB funds to support the Alameda/Oakland, Harbor Bay and East Bay/South San Francisco ferry services. In fiscal

year 2015-16, WETA will use sales tax revenue to pay for Alameda

Main Street ferry terminal access improvements, and to support purchase of a replacement for the M.V. Express II and the M.V. Taurus engine overhaul.

The Alameda Main Street access improvement project is another good example of a critical project fully funded by Measures B and BB. The joint WETA/City of Alameda project will make the old Officer’s Club parking lot across Main Street from the ferry terminal available for overflow ferry parking. The project includes lot repaving, installation of lighting and construction of a new cross walk, enabling riders to safely cross Main Street. The project will provide 121 parking spaces and is expected to be complete by June 1, 2016.

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